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Pilgrims

The group now known as the Pilgrims originated as a small congregation of Separating Congregationalists, one of many that opposed the Elizabethan church settlement, in the village of Scrooby, Nottinghamshire, England. They were led by William Brewster, who had become a Puritan while attending Cambridge.

By 1607, the group was feeling persecuted as a minority in the village of Scrooby and determined to emigrated to Holland, where they could exercise their religion freely. They voyaged to Amsterdam in 1608 and thence to Leyden (or Leiden) in May, 1609.

After several years, some of the congregation began to feel that Holland was not the ideal permanent solution and looked towards America. Their first objective was Virginia, and the Virginia Company welcomed them and granted a charter on June 9, 1619. In 1620, they formed a joint-stock company to operate a trading post, for which they received another charter from the Virginia Company on February 2, 1620.

Not all of the congregation, however, wanted to leave Leyden. A minority, led by Brewster, prepared to depart in the spring of 1620. A sixty-ton vessel, the Speedwell was prepared and provisioned in London. Another ship, the Mayflower was hired for the voyage. When the Speedwell proved unseaworthy, the decision was made to proceed with the Mayflower alone with as many as could be accommodated on board. It sailed from Plymouth on September 6, 1620, with 87 passengers, 14 servants and workmen, and a crew of 48. Only two of this number came from the original Scrooby Congregation, William Brewster and William Bradford.

Sighting land, which proved to be Cape Cod, on November 9, 1620, they decided to settle in present-day Massachusetts rather than proceeding to the mouth of the Hudson River, which was the terms under which their charter had been given. Before landing on November 11 in the harbor of Provincetown, 41 adult men of the group signed the Mayflower Compact, setting out their governance.

After considerable time exploring, the harbor at Plymouth was located on December 8 and the Mayflower landed their on December 16. After an arduous winter, they elected a governor and other officers in March 1621, but it was not until November did they receive a new charter, giving legal status to Plymouth Plantation.

- - - Books You May Like Include: ----

Plymouth Plantation 1620 - 1647 by William Bradford.
The colony founded by the Pilgrims that formed Plymouth Colony or Plymouth Plantation was one of the first permanent English settlements, along with J...
A Voyage Long and Strange: Rediscovering the New World by Tony Horwitz.
The bestselling author of Blue Latitudes takes us on a thrilling and eye-opening voyage to pre-Mayflower America On a chance visit to Plymouth Rock, T...
Who's That Stepping on Plymouth Rock? by Jean Fritz.
Using her trademark humorous style, Jean Fritz tells the story of Plymouth Rock--the granite boulder upon which it was decided the Pilgrims must have ...
Thanksgiving: The Pilgrims' First Year in America by Glenn Alan Cheney.
Thanksgiving is not a book about a holiday. It s about something that a few dozen survivors did after a year of suffering, death, struggle, and courag...
How Capitalism Saved America: The Untold History of Our Country, from the Pilgrims to the Present by Thomas J. DiLorenzo.
Here’s the real history of our country. How capitalism Saved America explodes the myths spun by Michael Moore, the liberal media, Hollywood, academia,...
The Adventurous Life of Myles Standish and the Amazing-but-True Survival Story of Plymouth Colony by Cheryl Harness.
Say hello to Myles Standish, a fiery man with short legs and an even shorter temper. When he got mad his face turned as red as his hair, earning him t...
A Great and Godly Adventure by Godfrey Hodgson.
The first Thanksgiving wasn't celebrated with turkey (there weren't any in Massachusetts) and didn't take place in 1621. Indeed the settlers, who pr...
Making Haste from Babylon: The Mayflower Pilgrims and Their World: A New History by Nick Bunker.
Backed by privateering aristocrats, London merchants, and xenophobic politicians, they were sectarian religious radicals who lived double and treble l...

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