Hudson River

The Hudson River is the major north-south river in New York State, navigable as far north as Albany. The completion of the Erie Canal connected the Hudson with the commerce of the Great Lakes, making New York City, whose harbor is the lowest part of the estuary of the Hudson, the country`s most important seaport. Tidal effects on the Hudson continue as far upstream as Troy.

The first commercial steamboat was the Clermont, which traveled the Hudson between New York City and Albany, beginning in 1807. The United States Military Academy is at West Point, on the west bank of the Hudson 40 miles north of New York City.

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Between the Rivers: Manhattan 1880-1920 by Jeff Hirsh.
The decades between 1880 and the 1920s were glorious ones for Manhattan. This sliver of land located between the rivers was evolving from a bustling s...
Revolutionary Bergen County The Road to Independence by Barbara Z. Marchant.
Along the banks of the Hudson River, New Jersey’s Bergen County endured the brunt of Revolutionary War violence. With an impressive compilation of sch...
Revolutionary Bergen County, The Road to Independence by Barbara Z. Marchant.
Along the banks of the Hudson River, New Jersey’s Bergen County endured the brunt of Revolutionary War violence. With an impressive compilation of sch...
Shadow Soldiers of the American Revolution Loyalist Tales from New York to Canada by Mark Jodoin.
In 1778, New York State Patriots forced colonists loyal to the British government to flee north into what became Ontario and Quebec. Many of the defia...
Peekskill's African American History, A Hudson Valley Community's Untold Story by John J. Curran.
The first African Americans of Peekskill had no say about making the Hudson Valley their home. What they did decide was what kind of home to make of i...
Legends and Lore of Sleepy Hollow and the Hudson Valley by Jonathan Kruk.
Washington Irving’s The Legend of Sleepy Hollow is one of the best-known works of American literature. But what other myths lie hidden behind the land...
Wedding of the Waters: The Erie Canal and the Making of a Great Nation by Peter L. Bernstein.
Begun in 1817 and completed in 1825, the Erie Canal stretches 363 miles across upstate New York from Buffalo on Lake Erie to Albany on the Hudson Rive...
Ten Tea Parties: Patriotic Protests That History Forgot by Joseph Cummins.
Everyone knows the story of the Boston Tea Party—in which colonists stormed three British ships and dumped 92,000 pounds of tea into Boston Harbor. Bu...

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