Cleveland and the Tariff

Grover Cleveland was a true conservative. He opposed unnecessary government meddling in the nation's economy, arguing that a high tariff was an interfering factor in the natural economic order of things. Cleveland also was embarrassed by the continued growth of the government surplus. Convinced that a change was needed, the president used his annual message to Congress in 1887 to argue for meaningful reductions in tariff duties.

Congress refused to follow the president's lead.

The maintenance of a large Treasury surplus was damaging to the farmer and debtor elements of the South and West. Since the excess revenue was simply locked away in government vaults, the currency supply was restricted. This set the stage for a national discussion on related issues of the tariff and the money supply; the forum would be the campaign leading to the Election of 1888.

Off-site search results for "Cleveland and the Tariff"...

The protective tariff
... throughout the North had given the protectionists the balance of strength, and the free-traders, finding themselves powerless to gain their ends in Congress, began to indulge in treasonable language, claiming that individual States had the ...
http://www.publicbookshelf.com/public_html/The_Great_Republic_By_the_M ...

Tariff Merely the Pretext
more, and after the year 1842, you pay on coarse woolens thirty-five per cent. If this is not Protection, I cannot understand; therefore the Tariff was only the pretext, and Disunion and a Southern Confederacy the real object. The next pretext ...
http://www.adena.com/adena/usa/cw/cw267.htm

1816-1860: The Second American Party System and the Tariff
... upward revision of the tariff rates enacted by the Tariff of 1828, dubbed the Tariff of Abominations by its southern opponents, formed the basis for the nullification crisis. John Calhoun and South Carolina’s Nullification Strategy. Calhoun ...
http://www.tax.org/Museum/1816-1860.htm