Contact  |  About us

Grand Banks

Grand Banks map

The Grand Banks are among the world's largest and richest resource areas, renowned for both their valuable fish stocks and petroleum reserves. Situated off the southeast coast of Newfoundland, the Grand Banks are actually a series of raised submarine plateaus with a water depth ranging between 120 and 600 feet and spreading for a length of about 350 miles.

Relative shallowness allows extensive marine animal and plant life to flourish on the bottom. Further, the warm waters of the Gulf Stream pass over the southern portion of the Banks in winter, but cover almost all of the Grand Banks in summer.

The most prolific fish species on the Grand Banks has traditionally been cod, but there also are flounder, haddock, ocean perch and hundreds of other species.

Portuguese and Basque fishermen fished the Grand Banks as early as the 1400s, but it was not until after John Cabot's voyage to the New World in 1497 that knowledge of the Banks and their valuable fishing resources spread throughout Europe. The Banks have been continually fished since that time by fleets from England, France, Spain, Portugal and later Newfoundland, Canada and the United States.

Off-site search results for ""Grand Banks""...

Early European Explorers - a Teacher's Guide
... find route to China, found the New World John Cabot England 1497 Sailed to the Grand Banks while doing the same thing Amerigo Vespucci Italy 1498 Sailed South America's coast - later maps called it "America" Vasco Da Gama Portugal 1498 Sailed ...
http://www.floridahistory.com/early-explorers.html

MathFiction: The Problem of Cell 13 (Jacques Futrelle)
... cases when it doesn't." I just learned, from reading Clarke's Ghost from the Grand Banks that Futrelle died at the sinking of the Titanic.More information about this work can be found at www.amazon.com.(This is just one work of mathematical ...
http://math.cofc.edu/kasman/MATHFICT/mfview.php?callnumber=mf150

Ocean in Motion: Currents - Charactersitics
When it reaches North Carolina, around Cape Hatteras, it begins to drift off into the North Atlantic towards the Grand Banks near Newfoundland. The Gulf Stream usually travels at a speed of 3 or 4 knots.     Contact: CyberScientist@onr.navy.mil ...
http://www.onr.navy.mil/focus/ocean/motion/currents1.htm

privacy policy