Freeport Doctrine

At Freeport, Illinois, on August 27, 1858, in the second of the Lincoln-Douglas debates, Douglas made an effort to revive the doctrine of popular sovereignty, which had been imperiled by the Dred Scott decision.

He stated that slavery could legally be barred from the territories if the territorial legislatures simply refused to enact the type of police regulations necessary to make slavery work. Without a legal framework and enforcement officials, slavery would be excluded.

Douglas' statement enabled him to retain his Senate seat, but it split the Democratic Party and lost what little support he had in the South.

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The Freeport Doctrine
Title: Freeport Doctrine Author: Stephen Douglas Year Published: 1858 LADIES AND GENTLEMEN: The silence with which you have listened to Mr. Lincoln during his hour is creditable to this vast audience, composed of men of various poFreeport Doctrine Author: Stephen Douglas Year Published: 1858 LADIES AND GENTLEMEN: The silence with which you have listened to Mr. Lincoln during his hour is creditable to this vast audience, composed of men of various political parties.
http://www.civics-online.org/library/formatted/texts/freeport.html

Monroe Doctrine
The doctrine's greatest extension came with Theodore Roosevelt's Corollary, which inverted the original meaning of the doctrine and came to justify unilateral U.S. broadened in Latin America.
http://future.state.gov/future/when/timeline/1801_timeline/monroe_doct ...

Monroe Doctrine
The two principles of the Doctrine, noncolonization and nonintervention, were not new or original. However, it was Monroe who explicitly proclaimed them as policy and it was a keystone of foreign policy for many years. Monroe had no thought of ...
http://www.famousamericans.net/famousamericans-cla-cob/dewittclinton/J ...

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