Chesapeake Bay

Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the United States. It is about 200 miles long, from the mouth of the Susquehanna on the north to its opening onto the Atlantic Ocean. Verrazzano sailed past Chesapeake Bay in 1524 but did not explore it. Captain John Smith explored it extensively between 1607 and 1609. Large numbers of cavaliers and their entourages migrated to the area between 1640 and 1675.

Chesapeake Bay has afforded hostile forces access into the heartland of America during several conflicts. During the American Revolution, the British Navy sailed up to Baltimore and during the War of 1812, they found little to oppose them when they marched landed near Baltimore and marched the short distance on the national capital Washington, which they burned.

During the Civil War, Chesapeake Bay was the site of the famous battle between the Monitor and the Merrimack, the first engagement between iron-sided naval vessels in history.

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The Delaware and Raritan Canal at Work by Linda J. Barth.
The Delaware and Raritan Canal connected the Chesapeake Bay with New England ports, allowing a wide variety of vessels to use the waterway and avoid t...
Maritime Annapolis A History of Watermen, Sails and Midshipmen by Rosemary F. Williams.
Annapolis has graced the banks of the Severn River and the Chesapeake Bay since the seventeenth century, experiencing fortunes that ebb and flow with ...
Fort Monroe by Paul S. Morando, David J. Johnson.
Fort Monroe was once a powerful symbol of America’s national defense system. From 1823 to 1945, its primary military mission was to protect Hampton Ro...
Fort Wool Star-Spangled Banner Rising by J. Michael Cobb.
Fort Wool, now a quiet historical landmark, has been witness to some of the most influential figures and events in American history. Originally named ...
A History of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal by David A. Berry.
A thousand hands shaped its banks and a thousand ships have traversed the waters of a canal that defined a region. The Chesapeake and Delaware Canal h...
Written in Bone: Buried Lives of Jamestown and Colonial Maryland by Sally M. Walker.
On a hot summer day in 2005, Dr. Douglas Owsley of the Smithsonian Institution peered into an excavated grave, carefully examining the fragile skeleto...