Cotton Culture

In the 1790s, the economy of the South was in decline. Demand for tobacco had dropped on the world market and production of the crop had depleted the soil in many tideland areas. This economic slump had reduced the importance of slaves and the institution appeared to be dying slowly. Other crops such as rice and indigo also were less profitable given that subsidies from the mother country were no longer available after independence.

Slaves had never been an important part of the economy of the North, where most of the states had either outlawed the practice or provided for gradual manumission. Congressional action in 1808 to end the slave trade provoked little protest, even from Southern sources.

This picture was transformed through the activities of Eli Whitney, inventor of the cotton gin.

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DESTINY OF COTTON CULTURE
THE DESTINY OF COTTON CULTURE. The "future of the Cotton culture in the United States" has been the subject of a well considered and well reasoned series of essays in the Southern Cultivator, of Augusta, Ga. From the March number weCOTTON CULTURE. The "future of the Cotton culture in the United States" has been the subject of a well considered and well reasoned series of essays in the Southern Cultivator, of Augusta, Ga. From the March number weCotton culture in the United States" has been the subject of a well considered and well reasoned series of essays in the Southern Cultivator, of Augusta, Ga. From the March number we quote the ...
http://members.aol.com/jfepperson/debow2.html

Plantation Agriculture: Cotton Culture
Following Eli Whitney's invention of the cotton gin in 1793, short-staple cotton became the staple crop across much of the South. While prior to 1800 the Piedmont of the Carolinas and Georgia was settled mainly by subsistence farmers and ...
http://www.cr.nps.gov/goldcres/cultural/plantcotton.html

Cotton
High cotton prices provided both the demand for and the capital necessary to purchase more slaves. This fact led South Carolinians (at the behest of backcountry farmers) to reopen the international slave trade in 1803. After Congress banned the ...
http://www.americanforeignrelations.com/Co-Da/Cotton.html